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CYTO 2017

June 10–14, 2017 | Hynes Convention Center, Boston

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CYTO 2017

June 10–14, 2017

Hynes Convention Center, Boston

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Deeply profile cell phenotype and function

Visit Fluidigm at Booth 79 and learn how you can deeply profile precious samples across a range of cell surface and intracellular markers, all from a single tube. Using multiparameter mass cytometry, modular Maxpar® panel kits and a catalog of over 600 metal-labeled antibodies, you can reveal cell signatures in higher dimension to reach your next breakthrough.

Join us at the Commercial Tutorial

Advancing human health and disease research with mass cytometry

Mass cytometry is a powerful research tool for elucidating the mechanisms underlying human disease and assessing treatment efficacy. Enabling high-parameter studies through modular panel design, mass cytometry has quickly become a mainstay at multiple immune monitoring core facilities and translational research laboratories around the world.

In this tutorial, Sean Bendall, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Pathology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, will discuss:

  • Basic principles of mass cytometry (CyTOF® technology).
  • Use of the technology in both low-plex (15–25 parameters) and high plex (>30 parameters) research studies.
  • Application examples for immune profiling as well as intracellular cytokine and signaling protein analysis.

Noah Saederup, PhD, of Fluidigm will provide an overview of Maxpar reagents for mass cytometry, with special focus on modular panel kits. These kits:

  • Identify all major human and mouse leukocyte populations.
  • Expand leukocyte analysis to include cell cycle, intracellular cytokine expression or signaling status.
  • Enable deep profiling of human T cell populations including expression of key checkpoint molecules.

Tuesday, June 13
12:30–1:30 pm
Hynes Convention Center
Ballroom C

Box lunch provided. Seating is limited.

Register

Speakers

Advancing human health and disease research with mass cytometry 
Sean Bendall, PhD

Sean Bendall, PhD
Assistant Professor, Department of Pathology
Stanford University, School of Medicine

Simplifying panel design

Noah Saederup, PhD

Noah Saederup, PhD
Product Manager, Reagents
Fluidigm
South San Francisco, CA

View Helios Product Presentation

The need to distinguish an ever-increasing array of newly identified cell types in size-limited samples is driving interest in higher-parameter cytometry. Mass cytometry provides the solution and is now offered as a service in core facilities around the world.

Visit us at Booth 79 to learn more.

Exhibition hours
Sunday, June 11, 6:00–8:00 pm
Monday, June 12, 10:00 am–7:00 pm
Tuesday, June 13, 10:00 am–5:00 pm
Wednesday, June 14, 10:00 am–2:00 pm

Helios, a CyTOF system

With Helios™ mass cytometry you can identify and characterize changes in multiple cell populations simultaneously, obtaining maximal information from every precious sample.

Experience how easy it is to build 15-to-30-plex analysis panels using Maxpar prevalidated modular kits.

Then, choose from over 600 preconjugated antibodies to further customize your panel.

Helios

Visit Posters and Presentations Featuring Fluidigm Technology

CYTO® 2017 features a number of talks and posters featuring mass cytometry as a key component in the discovery of new cell types and fresh insights into cellular function. Attend the presentations listed below, and visit us at Booth 79 for a complete list of talks and posters.

Oral Presentations | Saturday, June 10–Wednesday, June 14

Saturday, June 10

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Location

9:30-11:00 am Basic CyTOF® Mike Leipold,       
Stanford Human Immune Monitoring Core
Scientific Tutorial 3
Room 302
1:30-3:00 pm Stochastic Neighbor Embedding Methods: t-SNE and Verity Cen-se’ Bruce Bagwell,
Verity Software House
Scientific Tutorial 12
Room 312

Sunday, June 11

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Location

10:30 am Single-Cell Developmental Classification of B-Cell Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia at Diagnosis Reveals Predictors of Relapse Zinaida Good,       
Stanford University
Ballroom C
10:30 am Statistical Methods for Differential Discovery in Multi-Dimensional Flow and Mass Cytometry (CyTOF) Data Lucas Weber,       
University of Zurich
Room 312
10:30 am A Cross-Sample Cell-Type Specific Normalization Algorithm for Clinical Mass Cytometry Datasets Sofie Van Gassen,       
Ghent University
Room 304
10:50 am Quantitative Comparison of Conventional and tSNE-Based Gating Analyses William O'Gorman,       
Genentech
Room 312
11:10 am MetaCyto: A Framework for Automated Meta-Analysis of Cytometry Data Zicheng Hu,       
UCSF
Room 304
3:30-5:30 pm Lifting the ‘Curse of Dimensionality’ from Single-Cell Data Nikolay Samusik,       
Stanford University
Workshop 7
Room 309

Monday, June 12

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Location

10:30 am

High-Dimensional Single-Cell Phenotypic Analysis Differentiates Islet- and Viral-Specific CD8 T Cells in Type 1 Diabetes Subjects Alice Wiedeman,       
Benaroya Research Institute
Room 312
10:50 am High-Dimensional Single-Cell Data Elucidates the Role of Bcl-2 Family Proteins in Drug Sensitivity in Multiple Myeloma Melissa Ko,       
Stanford University
Room 312

11:10 am

Immport Galaxy, Web- Platform for Flow Cytometry and CyTOF Analysis Cristel G. Thomas,       
Northrop Grumman
Room 309
11:30 am High-Dimensional Cytometry for Interrogating Immunity and Disease Thomas Ashhurst,       
University of Sydney, Australia
Room 312

3:45-5:15 pm

Launching and Supporting Basic and Translational Studies Incorporating Mass Cytometry Jonathan Irish, Vanderbuilt University
Adeeb Rahman, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Bill O'Gorman, Genentech
Workshop 13
Room 306

Tuesday, June 13

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Location

11:30 am Wild Immunology Assessed by Multidimensional Mass Cytometry Christos Nikolaou,
Charite Universitatsmedizin
Room 306
11:30 am Detection of Anti-Toxin Heavy-Metal Tagged Antibodies Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Mass Cytometry (CyTOF) Carmen Gondhalekar,       
Purdue University
Room 304
12:30-1:30 pm Advancing Human Health and Disease Research with Mass Cytometry Sean Bendall,
Stanford University School of Medicine
Commercial Tutorial
Ballroom C

Wednesday, June 14

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Location

10:30 am Deep Immuno-Phenotyping by CyTOF Differentiates TB Patients from Asymptomatic M. tuberculosis-Infected Individuals Virginie Rozot,       
Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, Cape Town, South Africa
Room 306
10:50 am Lifting the Curse of Dimensionality with Locally Sparse Distance Metrics Nikolay Samusik,       
Stanford University
Room 312
10:50 am Quantifying the Central Dogma of Molecular Biology with Single Cell Resolution Sean Bendall,       
Stanford University School of Medicine
Ballroom A
11:10 am A Simplified Budget Version of Mass-Cell-Barcoding Used for Direct Cell- And Tissue-Labeling Christoph Schwarzler,       
EPFL, Switzerland
Ballroom A

Poster Session I | Monday, June 12 | 5:15-6:45 pm | Exhibit Hall CD

Title

Authors

Poster Number

Biomarkers for Individualized Natalizumab Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis G. Bringeland, C. Vedeler, K. Myhr and S. Gavasso. University of Bergen, Norway and Haukeland University Hospital, Norway B19
High Quality Reagent Generation for Mass Cytometry Receptor Quantification Assay C. Stevens, G. Surpris, F. Li, K. Wright, K. Atkuri, L. King and H. Neubert. Pfizer, U.S.A. B25
Beyond Gating and Clustering: Feature Selection from Mass Cytometry Data Y. Shen, B. Chaigne-Delalande, R. Lee and W. Losert. National Institute for Health Research, United Kingdom, National Institutes of Health, U.S.A., University of Maryland College Park, U.S.A. and University of Bristol, United Kingdom B55
Comprehensive Characterization of the Immune Response in Blood and Tissues Using Mass Cytometry A. Delgado, B. Beitz, T. Dott, M. Ripaux-Lefevre, A. Gaudin, C. Couturier, S. Planel, A. Rekiki and F. Porcheray. BIOASTER, France B137
Assessment of Single Cell Chromatin Content (‘Chromotyping’) Reveals Hidden States that Underlie Differential Cell Function R. Baskar, A. Collier, M. Angelo, P. Rugg-Gunn and S. Bendall. Babraham Institute, United Kingdom and Stanford University, U.S.A. B161
Next-Generation Click Chemistry-Based Labeling Reagents for Mass Cytometry Application O. Ornatsky, B. Allo, A. Bouzekri, N. Talaei, J. Watson, X. Lou and V. Baranov. Fluidigm Canada, Canada B245
Comprehensive Single-Cell Phenotyping of Human B Cells Reveals Broad Heterogeneity within Previously Defined Compartments D. Glass, A. Tsai, S. Quake and S. Bendall. Stanford University, U.S.A. B261

Poster Session II | Tuesday, June 12 | 3:15-4:45 pm | Exhibit Hall CD

Title

Authors

Poster Number

A Novel Approach to Activated Cell Cluster Identification by High-Dimensional Phospho-Mass Cytometry Using Stable Intracellular Attributes Jitakshi De, Deepath Medical Diagnostics B4
Mass Cytometry for Head and Neck Cancer Research T. Brodie, V. Tosevski, M. Medova and Y. Zimmer. University of Zurich, Switzerland, Insel Gruppe AG, Switzerland and University of Bern, Switzerland B12
High-Dimensional Analysis of Human PBMCs: Mass versus Flow Cytometry S. Lear, A. Au-Yeung, C. Takahashi, W. O’Gorman and C. Green. Genentech, U.S.A. B22
Multiparametric Immunophenotyping of Urinary Leukocytes in Lupus Nephritis by Mass Cytometry S. Baumgart, M. Bertolo, A. Schulz, A. Radbruch, F. Hiepe, H. Mei, P. Enghard and A. Grützkau. Leibniz Association, Germany, Charité Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Germany, Charité, University Hospital, Germany and Deutsches RheumaForschungszentrum, Germany B74
Bismuth New Channel for High-Dimensional Single Cell Mass Cytometry G. Han. Stanford University, U.S.A. B116
An Immune Clock of Pregnancy B. Gaudilliere, E. Ganio, A. Tsai, S. Van Gassen, D. Gaudilliere, M. Angst and N. Aghaeepour. Stanford University, U.S.A. B124
Characterizing the Effect of Interferons on the Monocyte Compartment T. Salame, M. Gross, E. David, L. Maor and S. Jung. Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel B158
Continuous Visualization of Differences Between Biological Conditions in Single Cells T. Burns, N. Samusik and G. Nolan. Stanford University, U.S.A. B188
A Universal Approach to Single-Cell Barcoding in Live Human Cells F. Hartmann, E. Simonds and S. Bendall. Stanford University, U.S.A. and University of California San Francisco, U.S.A. B276

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