Japan-News

CYTO 2018

April 28–May 2, 2018 | Prague, Czech Republic

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Visualize a new path forward

At CYTO® 2018, a number of talks and posters will be featuring mass cytometry and Imaging Mass Cytometry as key components in the discovery of new cell types and the interrogation of cellular function and the tissue microenvironment.

Visit us at Booth 38 to learn more or download a complete list of talks and posters today

Join us at the CYTO 2018 Commercial Tutorials

Establishing Imaging Mass Cytometry in a Core Facility to Empower Highly Multiplexed Tissue Imaging

Date: Monday, April 30
Time: 12:30–1:30 pm
Location: South Hall 2B
Box lunch provided. Seating is limited.

Register

Speakers

Susanne Heck Susanne Heck, PhD
Head of Flow Cytometry Research Platform
NIHR Biomedical Research Centre
Guy's and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust and King’s College London
Jared Burks Jared Burks, PhD
Assistant Professor
Co-Director, Flow Cytometry and Cellular Imaging Core Facility
Department of Leukemia
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Many flow cytometry cores offer highly multiplexed mass cytometry services using Helios™, a CyTOF® system. Heck and Burks were among the first of a growing number of core lab leaders expanding their mass cytometry service offerings to include Imaging Mass Cytometry (IMC™) services on the Hyperion™ Imaging System. Hyperion sets a new standard in highly multiplexed tissue imaging by enabling the detection of up to 37 protein markers within the context of the tissue microenvironment.

In this workshop, Heck and Burks will share their perspectives and insights on establishing IMC at their facilities. Included will be a brief overview of IMC, requirements to acquire and set up an instrument in a core facility and discussion of how this system can be integrated into a full core service offering. They will present information on the workflow, experimental design and data analysis.

Mass Cytometry for Clinical Research: Establishing a Systems Immune Monitoring Program

Date: Tuesday, May 1
Time: 12:30–1:30 pm
Location: South Hall 2B
Box lunch provided. Seating is limited.

Register

Speakers

Jonathan Irish Jonathan M. Irish, PhD
Assistant Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology
Scientific Director, Mass Cytometry Center of Excellence
Vanderbilt University
Greg Seltzer Greg Stelzer, PhD
Director of Mass Cytometry Market Development
Fluidigm

In this tutorial, Irish will share his experience establishing mass cytometry services for the Vanderbilt research community, including the development of immune monitoring panels as well as streamlined workflows for sample acquisition and computational analysis. He will also show how mass cytometry is being used at Vanderbilt to characterize immunotherapy responses in blood and tumors.

Stelzer will provide an overview of how the Helios mass cytometry system combined with a 29-marker immune cell-specific panel from the Maxpar® reagent catalog comprehensively profiles the immune makeup of human PBMC samples. His presentation will include examples of data analysis using both manual gating with Cytobank and an automated approach in development by Verity Software House.

View Product Presentations

The need to distinguish an ever-increasing array of newly identified cell types in size limited samples is driving interest in higher-parameter cytometry. Mass cytometry provides the solution and is now offered as a service in core facilities around the world.

Visit us at Booth 38 to learn more.

Exhibition Hours
Sunday, April 29, 6:00–8:00 pm
Monday, April 30, 10:00 am–7:00 pm
Tuesday, May 1, 10:00 am–5:00 pm
Wednesday, May 2, 10:00 am–3:30 pm

Helios

Identify and deeply characterize changes in multiple cell populations simultaneously, obtaining maximal information from every precious sample.

 Helios, a CyTOF System


Hyperion Imaging System

Visualize 4 to 37 protein markers in the spatial context of the tissue microenvironment using Imaging Mass Cytometry.

 Hyperion Imaging System


Visit Posters and Presentations Featuring Fluidigm Technology

CYTO® 2018 features a number of talks and posters featuring mass cytometry and Imaging Mass Cytometry as key components in the discovery of new cell types and fresh insights into cellular function and the tissue microenvironment.

Attend the presentations listed below, and visit us at Booth 38 for a complete list of talks and posters.

Oral Presentations | Saturday, April 28–Wednesday, May 2

Saturday, April 28

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Session, Location

9:00-10:30 am The Facility at the Cutting Edge: How (and Why) to Implement High-End Technologies in the Shared Resource Environment Vinko Tosevski
University of Zurich
Scientific Tutorial 5,
South Hall 2A
11:00 am - 12:30 pm Analysis of Tissue Ecosystems by Imaging Mass Cytometry™ and histoCAT™ Bernd Bodenmiller
University of Zurich

Scientific Tutorial 7,
South Hall 2B

Sunday, April 29

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Session, Location

9:00 am Highly Multiplexed Imaging of Tissues with Subcellular Resolution by Imaging Mass Cytometry Bernd Bodenmiller
Institute of Molecular Life Sciences, Zurich
18,
Congress Hall
10:50 am Using Suspension and Imaging Mass Cytometry to Track Changes to Hematopoiesis and Cellular Infiltration in Neuropathology Thomas Ashhurst
University of Sydney and Centenary Institute
21 Parallel 4,
Forum Hall
11:30 am Alternative Mass-Cell-Barcoding Options and Their Application to Control Samples Christoph Schwärzler
EPFL
35 Parallel 4,
South Hall 2B
11:30 am Optimal Computer-Assisted Analysis of Immune Cell Response to High-Fat Diet in Mouse Adipose Tissue and Liver Using Mass Cytometry Olivier Molendi-Coste
INSERM, Institut Pasteur de Lille
39 Parallel 5,
South Hall 1

Monday, April 30

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Session, Location

11:10 am Immunosuppression in Space: System-Level, Single-Cell Human Adaptations to Microgravity Brice Gaudilliere
Stanford University
58 Parallel 7,
South Hall 1
11:30 am What Your Cells Are Not Telling You: A Deep Learning Approach to Robustly Classify Monolithic and Novel Cell Types in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Josef Spidlen
FlowJo, LLC
67 Parallel 9,
Panorama Hall
12:30-1:30 pm Establishing Imaging Mass Cytometry in a Core Facility to Empower Highly Multiplexed Tissue Imaging Susanne Heck
Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust
Jared Burks
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
South Hall 2B
2:15 pm High Dimensional Immunological Data by Mass Cytometry Giuseppe Pantaleo
University of Lausanne
Plenary Session 2,
South Hall 2B
3:45 pm Best Practices for Development and Implementation of Automated, Standardized Multiparameter CyTOF® Panels Radhika Rayanki, Chris Groves
MedImmune
Thomas Ashhurst
University of Sydney
Nicole Paul
Dan-Farber Cancer Institute
85 Workshop 10,
Panorama Hall

Tuesday, May 1

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Session, Location

10:30 am Immune Profiling of Lymph Nodes from Breast Cancer Patients by Mass Cytometry Kanutte Huse
Oslo University Hospital
90 Parallel 13,
Forum Hall
10:30 am What Do We Do with All These Cell Subsets? Statistical Modeling of Cytometry Data Greg Finak
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
102 Parallel 16,
Panorama Hall
10:50 am Immune Cell Profiling of Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients Undergoing Helminth Therapy by Mass Cytometry Axel Schulz
German Rheumatism Research Center (DRFZ)
91 Parallel 13,
Forum Hall
10:50 am Computational Analysis of Cytometry Data Using the FlowGate Cyberinfrastructure Yu Qian
J. Craig Venter Institute
103 Parallel 16,
Panorama Hall
11:10 am Assessment of Maternal Peripheral Immune System by Mass Cytometry to Predict the Onset of Labor Xiaoyuan Han
Stanford University
92 Parallel 13,
Forum Hall
11:10 am SIMON: An Automated Machine Learning System Reveals a Subset of CD8+ T Cells Responsible for Improved Antibody Responses to Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Adriana Tomic
Stanford University
112 Parallel 16,
North Hall
11:10 am Inference of Branching Developmental Pathways in the Highly Complex Mass Cytometry Datasets of Lymphocyte Development Jan Stuchlý
Charles University and University Hospital Motol
104 Parallel 16,
Panorama Hall
11:30 am Characterization of Immune Signatures by Mass Cytometry in Cancer Immunotherapy Clinical Trials Diana Bonilla
MD Anderson Cancer Center
93 Parallel 13,
Forum Hall
11:30 am High-Content Analysis of Immune Infiltrate in Solid Tumors Using Imaging Mass Cytometry Qing Chang
Fluidigm
101 Parallel 15,
South Hall 2A
11:30 am Computational Integration of Mass Cytometry, Cell-Free Transcriptome, Microbiome, Proteome, and Metabolome Assays, for Multiomics Profiling of Term Pregnancy Nina Aghaeepour
Stanford University
105 Parallel 16,
Panorama Hall
12:30-1:30 pm Mass Cytometry for Clinical Research: Establishing a Systems Immune Monitoring Program Jonathan M. Irish
Vanderbilt University
Greg Stelzer
Fluidigm
South Hall 2B

Wednesday, May 2

Time

Title

Presenter, Institution

Session, Location

10:50 am Defining the Tissue-Specific Immune Signature in Limited Human Tissue Samples Using 30-Parameter Flow Cytometry Florian Mair
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
132 Parallel 21,
Forum Hall
11:10 am High Dimensional Immune Profiling via CyTOF Reveals Robust Recovery of Functional and Viable Cells from Frozen Gastrointestinal Tissue and Identifies Immune Differences between Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s Disease Liza Konnikova
University of Pittsburgh

125 Parallel 19,
Panorama Hall



Poster Presentations | Monday, April 30–Tuesday, May 1

Monday, April 30 | 5:15–6:45 pm | Level 3 Foyer

Poster Number

Title

First Author, Institution

B13 156 TNF-Signaling Signatures in PBMC of Newly Diagnosed Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis, and Healthy Individuals Lucius Bader
Haukeland University Hospital
B15 157 Receptor Occupancy: A Standardized Approach for Mass Cytometry Gerd Bringeland
University of Bergen
B25 162 Biomarker Discovery Using a Generalized Bioinformatic Work Flow and High-Dimensional Single-Cell Mass Cytometry Carsten Krieg
Medical University of South Carolina
B129 214 Making Mass Cytometric Analysis, both Suspension and Imaging, Accessible for the Masses Nicholas King
University of Sydney
B157 228 Integration of Genomic and Mass Cytometry Data to Deeply Characterize the Functional Immune Environment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia in the Beat AML Cohort Yoko Kosaka
Oregon Health & Science University
B171 235 Use of Mass Cytometry in Identification of Multiple Cell Lineages in Acute Leukemia Jitka Stancikova
Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University
B173 236 Development of Mass Cytometry Panel for Acute B-Cell Precursor Leukemia with Switch into Monocytic Lineage Barbora Vakrmanová
Second Faculty of Medicine, Charles University
B193 246 A Lyophilized 30-Plex Human Whole Blood Immunophenotyping Antibody Panel for Mass Cytometry Vladimir Baranov
Fluidigm
B239 269 Systemic Immune Profile of Stroke Recovery Edward Ganio
Stanford University
B251 275 Characterizing 3 Human PBMC Preparations for Comparable and Quantitative Flow Cytometry Measurements Using Flow Cytometry and Mass Cytometry Lili Wang
National Institute of Standards and Technology
B257 278 Identification of Biomarkers of Risk of TB Disease in Adolescents Using Mass Cytometry Michael Leipold
Stanford University
B287 293 Automated Deep Profiling of Human Immune Cells Using Mass Cytometry Margaret Inokuma
Verity Software House
B305 302 Validation of Metal-Conjugated Antibodies on Bone Marrow FFPE Sections Using Imaging Mass Cytometry Qing Chang
Fluidigm
B315 307 Scatter Bodies for Morphometric Profiling by Single Cell Mass Cytometry in Human Hematopoietic Cells David Glass
Stanford University
B345 322 Systematic Examination of Whole Blood Sample Handling Procedure for Analysis of Immune Cell Function Edward Ganio
Stanford University
B389 344 Metal-Encoded Polystyrene Microbeads as a Mass Cytometry Calibration Standard, Covering Channels from Yttrium (89) to Bismuth (209) Jieyi Liu
University of Toronto
B413 356 Single-Cell Chromatin Content Capture (Chromotyping) Reveals Epigenetic States Underlying Functional Cell States in Human Hematopoietic Systems Sean Bendall
Stanford University
B435 577 Ek’Balam: A Hierarchy-Based Method for Labeling Cell Subsets in High Complexity Cytometry El-ad David Amir
Astrolabe Diagnostics, Inc.
B453 586 Identifying a Peripheral Immune Signature of Chronic Periodontitis Using Mass Cytometry Dyani Gaudilliere
Stanford University

Tuesday, May 1 | 3:15-4:45 pm | Level 3 Foyer

Poster Number

Title

First Author, Institution

B30 375 Interrogating Immune Cells: ChaRActeristics of Synovial Fluid Miriam Sandnes
University of Bergen
B34 377 Utilizing Mass Cytometry for Metabolic and Immune Profiling of CRISPER-Modified Primary CD4+ T-Cells Chad Stevens
Pfizer
B82 401 Choosing the Right Distance Metric for Mass Cytometry Data Analysis Pawel Durek
German Rheumatism Research Center (DRFZ)
B84 402 Interpretable Automated Gating and Classification of Mass Cytometry Data Using Machine Learning and Expert Knowledge Eric Nalisnick
University of California-Irvine
B88 404 Probing Signaling Heterogeneity in B-Cell Lymphomas Using Mass Cytometry and Computational Analysis Michael Gold
University of British Columbia
B90 405 Knowing What Is What: Artificial Intelligence for Cell Classification in Cytometry Jan Verhoeff
VU University Medical Centre Amsterdam
B194 457 High-Dimensional Immune Cell Profiling in Atopic Dermatitis: Is There More Than Just a Th2 Response? Sabine Baumgart
German Rheumatism Research Center (DRFZ)
B198 459 Development and Validation of a High-Parameter Mass Cytometry Immune Profiling Panel for Celiac Disease Jose Estevam
Takeda Pharmaceuticals
B204 462 Extended Phenotypic Immunome Characterization (EPIC): A Reference Atlas of the Changing Immune Landscape from Birth to Adulthood Salvatore Albani
Translational Immunology Institute
B236 478 Comparison of Methods for Whole Blood Preservation for Flow and Mass Cytometry Studies Concepción Marañón
Pfizer-University of Granada-Junta de Andalucía Centre for Genomics and Oncological Research, GENYO
B300 510 Influences of “Specific-Pathogen-Free” Aging in Murine Bone Marrow and Spleen Hematopoietic Cell Composition Assessed by Multidimensional Mass Cytometry Christos Nikolaou
Berlin-Brandenburg Center for Regenerative Therapies
B302 511 Heterogeneous Inflammatory and Regulatory Populations of T Cells in the Blood and Gut of IBD Patients Tomer-Meir Salame
Weizmann Institute of Science
B304 512 diffcyt: Differential Discovery in High-Dimensional Cytometry via High-Resolution Clustering Lukas Weber
University of Zurich
B312 516 Functionalized Metal-Labeled Polystyrene Beads for Mass Cytometry Axel Schulz
German Rheumatism Research Center (DRFZ)
B330 525 Mass Cytometry for Detection of Silver at the Bacterial Single Cell Level Yuting Guo
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ
B364 542 Identification of Age-Related Immune Signatures by Mass Cytometry Julian Braun
Charite University Hospital Berlin
B372 546 Characterization of Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling in Murine B Cells Using Mass Cytometry Carl Bortner
NIEHS/NIH
B388 554 Standardization and Normalization of Data Obtained by Imaging Mass Cytometry Taunia Closson
Fluidigm
B430 594 Expression of CD39 Distinguishes Cancer Unrelated from Tumor-Specific CD8+ Human Tumor Infiltrating T Cells Yannick Simoni
A*STAR
B434 596 Primes: The Building Blocks of Natural Numbers Can Be Used as Building Blocks of Cell Type Classifications Antonio Cosma
CEA
B442 600 Battle for High-Dimensional Flow: Fluorescence versus Metal Michael Solga
University of Virginia
B450 604 High-Dimensional Immunophenotyping of Human Systemic Autoimmune Diseases by Single-Cell Mass Cytometry Jozsef Balog
Biological Research Centre of HAS

Register for the Commercial Tutorials

Please complete the form below to attend our Commercial Tutorials at CYTO 2018.



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